• Fretwork
  • 1974 Stratocaster Refret

    img_5568

    This nice 1974 Stratocaster was in the shop for a refret. It is getting Jumbo frets but the neck was was made with a very thin curved rosewood veneer fretboard. The larger frets require a much deeper fret slot. I could have sawed the fret slots deeper but this would not have looked good from […]

  • Bridge Repairs
  • 1976 Gibson SG Refret and Custom Bridge Bushings

    76-gibson-sg-refretbridge-install-kent-scheffler-23 76-gibson-sg-refretbridge-install-kent-scheffler-48

    76-gibson-sg-refretbridge-install-kent-scheffler-31   76-gibson-sg-refretbridge-install-kent-scheffler-27 76-gibson-sg-refretbridge-install-kent-scheffler-30 76-gibson-sg-refretbridge-install-kent-scheffler-35

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The owner of the 1976 Gibson SG wanted to have it refretted, Sperzel tuners installed, and a roller bridge installed to replace the original harmonica bridge.  When doing repairs or upgrades on vintage instruments I always look for ways of installing hardware doesn’t alter the guitar and if possible is easily reversible.  The sperzel tuners were a good choice because the small hole for the locating pin is within the footprint of the original tuners.  Switching back would be quick and easy and the modification would not be visible.  The roller bridge, while it had the same post spacing required very different inserts.  Installing the new inserts would mean plugging the original holes and redrilling.  To avoid this I decided to make a pair of brass bushing that thread into the original inserts and are tapped to accept the new bridge posts.

  • Bridge Repairs
  • 1976 Gibson SG Refret and Custom Bridge Bushings

    76-gibson-sg-refretbridge-install-kent-scheffler-23 76-gibson-sg-refretbridge-install-kent-scheffler-48

    76-gibson-sg-refretbridge-install-kent-scheffler-31 76-gibson-sg-refretbridge-install-kent-scheffler-27 76-gibson-sg-refretbridge-install-kent-scheffler-30 76-gibson-sg-refretbridge-install-kent-scheffler-35

    The owner of the 1976 Gibson SG wanted to have it refretted, Sperzel tuners installed, and a roller bridge installed to replace the original harmonica bridge. When doing repairs or upgrades on vintage instruments I always look for ways of installing hardware doesn’t alter the guitar and if possible is easily reversible. The sperzel tuners were a good choice because the small hole for the locating pin is within the footprint of the original tuners. Switching back would be quick and easy and the modification would not be visible. The roller bridge, while it had the same post spacing required very different inserts. Installing the new inserts would mean plugging the original holes and redrilling. To avoid this I decided to make a pair of brass bushing that thread into the original inserts and are tapped to accept the new bridge posts.

  • Fretwork
  • Fender Mustang Refret

    img_4042 img_4041

    img_4060 img_4064

    The frets on this Mustang were in terrible condition. They were extremely rough, uneven, and had been filed to their limit. The fretboard had been lacquered and there had been some filing in between the frets leaving the surface scarred, ugly and with a flatter radius in the lower positions. The fretboards on these Mustangs are very thin so leveling the board and removing the finish had to be done with extreme care.

  • Fretwork
  • Robin Refret

    robin-refret-02 robin-refret-04

    I’ve seen a few botched refrets but this one takes the cake. The frets are rough, sharp, different sizes and it looks like they removed the old ones with a chisel and hammer! It wasn’t hard to get them out because they were so poorly seated but the slots were in terrible shape. In order to repair the damaged slots and rough edges I filled each slot with teflon dams, filled the spaces with rosewood dust, and wicked in thin superglue. After allowing this to dry overnight I removed the teflon spacers and sanded the superglue filler level with the fingerboard. All in all it doesn’t look so bad. I cleaned the slots and pressed the frets in using my drill press. For a little added insurance I wicked a little more superglue under the fret ends and then filed and polished as usual.